WEBSITE UPDATE

Welcome to the new ForeignAssistance.gov! The site has been redesigned to meet user needs. The information included on the website now contains VALID and OFFICIAL DATA. We hope you enjoy your experience. Submit feedback or comments through the contact us link.

$35.4 Billion

planned in Foreign Aid for FY 2015

Explore ForeignAssistance.gov to see how the U.S. Government invests in countries around the world.

Explore Map Search Data

Scroll to learn more

What is U.S. Government Foreign Assistance?

Foreign assistance is aid given by the United States to other countries to support global peace, security, and development efforts, and provide humanitarian relief during times of crisis. It is a strategic, economic, and moral imperative for the United States and vital to U.S. national security.

The first U.S. aid program took shape after World War II when then Secretary of State George Marshall acted to provide significant aid to Europe after the war to assist the continent in rebuilding its infrastructure, strengthening its economy, and stabilizing the region. This led to the creation of several foreign assistance programs in subsequent years to build off the success of the Marshall Plan. The next milestone for foreign assistance occurred in 1961, when President Kennedy signed the Foreign Assistance Act into law and created the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). This marked a significant increase in U.S. foreign assistance efforts and USAID became the first U.S. foreign assistance agency whose primary focus was long-term global development to include economic and social progress.

In 2010, President Obama signed the Presidential Policy Directive on Global Development, which calls for the elevation of development as a core pillar of American power in accord with diplomacy and defense for an integrated approach to national security. The directive governs U.S. efforts in support of global development and provides clear policy guidance to all U.S. government agencies managing and implementing foreign assistance.

Today, the U.S. manages foreign assistance programs in more than 100 countries around the world through the efforts of over 20 different U.S. Government agencies. These investments further America's foreign policy interests on issues ranging from expanding free markets, combating extremism, ensuring stable democracies, and addressing the root causes of poverty, while simultaneously fostering global good will.

Learn More About ForeignAssistance.Gov

Which Countries Receive U.S. Government Foreign Assistance?

U.S. Government agencies manage and implement foreign assistance funds through programs that benefit countries, regions, and the world. The U.S. Government provides assistance to over 100 countries around the world. Click below to learn more about one of these featured countries or explore the map to find details on all countries receiving foreign assistance.

How is Foreign Assistance Categorized?

Foreign assistance funding is classified into one of nine categories, which is further detailed into 52 sectors. Funds are uniquely aligned to one category and sector.

ForeignAssistance.gov’s nine categories are shown below.

Click to learn more about each category and its respective sectors.

Peace and Security

To help nations effectively establish the conditions and capacity for achieving peace, security, and stability; and for responding effectively against arising threats to national or international security and stability.

Peace and Security

$9.1 Billion

planned for FY 2015

View all data

Program Management

To provide the general management support required to ensure completion of U.S. foreign assistance objectives by facilitating program management, monitoring and evaluation, and accounting and tracking for costs.

Program Management

$1.6 Billion

planned for FY 2015

View all data

Economic Development

Generate rapid, sustained, and broad-based economic growth.

Economic Development

$3.1 Billion

planned for FY 2015

View all data

Health

To contribute to improvements in the health of people, especially women, children, and other vulnerable populations in countries of the developing world, through expansion of basic health services, including family planning; strengthening national health systems, and addressing global issues and special concerns such as HIV/AIDS and other infectious diseases.

Health

$8.7 Billion

planned for FY 2015

View all data

Multi-sector

Multi-Sector is used when a sector cannot be identified and/or aid may be cross-cutting across several categories

Multi-sector

$4.0 Billion

planned for FY 2015

View all data

Democracy, Human Rights, and Governance

To promote and strengthen effective democracies in recipient states and move them along a continuum toward democratic consolidation.

Democracy, Human Rights, and Governance

$2.4 Billion

planned for FY 2015

View all data

Humanitarian Assistance

To save lives, alleviate suffering, and minimize the economic costs of conflict, disasters and displacement. Humanitarian assistance is provided on the basis of need according to principles of universality, impartiality and human dignity. It is often organized by sectors, but requires an integrated, coordinated and/or multi-sectoral approach to be most effective. Emergency operations will foster the transition from relief, through recovery, to development, but they cannot and will not replace the development investments necessary to reduce chronic poverty or establish just social services.

Humanitarian Assistance

$4.7 Billion

planned for FY 2015

View all data

Education and Social Services

Promote equitable, effective, accountable, and sustainable formal and non-formal education systems and address factors that place individuals at risk for poverty, exclusion, neglect, or victimization. Help populations manage their risks and gain access to opportunities that support their full and productive participation in society. Help populations rebound from temporary adversity, cope with chronic poverty, reduce vulnerability, and increase self-reliance.

Education and Social Services

$1.2 Billion

planned for FY 2015

View all data

Environment

Activities that support the sustainability of a productive and clean environment by: ensuring that the environment and the natural resources upon which human lives and livelihoods depend are managed in ways that sustain productivity growth, a healthy population, as well as the intrinsic spiritual and cultural value of the environment, and conserving biodiversity and managing natural resources in ways that maintain their long-term viability and preserve their potential to meet the needs of present and future generations.

Environment

$711.4 Million

planned for FY 2015

View all data

Which Agencies Manage Foreign Assistance Funds?

There are over 20 U.S. Government agencies responsible for either funding or executing U.S. foreign assistance activities. The agencies listed below represent the agencies which are currently reporting to ForeignAssistance.gov. These 10 reporting agencies represent approximately 98% of all U.S. foreign assistance. All agencies are working to improve the quantity and quality of their data and to report data on a quarterly basis.

Click to learn more about each Agency.
Back to all agencies
  • U.S. Agency for International Development
  • Peace Corps
  • U.S. Department of State
  • U.S. African Development Foundation
  • Millennium Challenge Corporation
  • U.S. Department of Agriculture
  • Inter-American Foundation
  • U.S. Department of the Treasury
  • Department of Defense
  • Department of Health and Human Services
    Explore Map